Register  |  Sign In
View unanswered posts | View active topics It is currently Mon Jan 18, 2021 5:39 am



Reply to topic  [ 9 posts ] 
 How Much Does Streaming Ruin The Façade of the Blockbuster? 
Author Message
KJ's Most Embarssing Misspeller
User avatar

Joined: Mon Oct 10, 2005 4:20 pm
Posts: 17
Location: The District
Post How Much Does Streaming Ruin The Façade of the Blockbuster?
The reaction to WW84 has been very negative and most of that is earned because the film is frankly just not good (except Pedro Pascal, who kills it).

But I think there's a much deeper thing going on which most of you I think would agree with but wanted to just deeper dive. To me, the reaction to WW84 and of other big-budget streaming releases (Six Underground, The Old Guard, etc.) just illustrates the stark difference in way that mass audiences digest content at home vs. in theaters. And it's why the blockbuster film will likely die if theaters lose their relevance.

Most blockbuster films do not have great plotting or character development. It's why there is usually a very strong positive reaction to a blockbuster that actually has these elements. This will sound arrogant but we are all film lovers so I think we can agree that mass audiences don't necessarily recognize just how low their acceptance is of mediocre storytelling with blockbuster films.

However, I don't find this to be a significant issue on its own. For the blockbuster film primary goal is not meant to be an exceptional story; it is meant to be a immersive visual spectacle. It is obviously ideal if it can achieve that AND tell a great story with great characters. But it is not a necessary requirement for it to be successful. Being able to absorb a mass audience into its world for two hours is good enough.

The theatrical experience, with its big screen, booming sound, and audience reaction boosts the ability of a film to achieve this immersion. This is just an objective truth to me. What I also am starting to realize may be an objective truth is that the home experience is not only just lesser then the theatrical one but that the gap is so massive that it will be impossible for any blockbuster, regardless of quality, to get a significantly strong reception from a mass audience if it just goes to streaming first.

Without the theatrical venue, mass audiences just can't appreciate the spectacle of these films. They'll become more aware of just how silly and mediocre the storytelling elements of them are. This was always the case but the self-awareness of the mass audiences was never there because they could easily just get immersed into the blockbuster. Streaming limits this ability so much that only a few films will probably able to achieve it at best. The vast majority of blockbusters will be more exposed and audiences will appreciate them less. You may say that this is fine since the shitty blockbusters should be punished but I should note that this will happen to all blockbusters regardless of quality. A film series like Mission Impossible, which I think reaches the height of modern day blockbuster cinema, will just have a lesser reaction at scale.

But there's other aspects that streaming hurts. For one, the marketing/hype campaign is just smaller. This in general I think deflates the excitement of a film and I believe that pre-viewing excitement is correlated on aggregate to the ability of a film creating immersion. WW84 just dropped on Christmas Day on HBO Max with significant less of a marketing campaign than it would have normally had. Sure, there were ads and stuff but a major blockbuster campaign is apart of the immersion experience. You see the trailers for months before in theaters, the merchandise and tie-ins are EVERYWHERE, etc. A streaming film just has never been able to generate anything close to that build-up and I'm not sure if it can for financial reasons. A streamer platform I don't think can run 100m+ marketing campaigns for multiple films in a given year. They may eventually be able to justify it for one big film but most studios these days have multiple tentpoles they try to push out. There's just too much to handle for them to just leverage so much of their marketing spend pushing out one piece of content.

The other major aspect is availability/consumer choice. When a blockbuster comes out in theaters, it is usually on the most theaters and screens in the country for that week. Most theaters will only have maybe 4-5 other films playing with less showtimes. The blockbuster's competition is only against a handful of films that week and has a advantage of being new to market and have the highest supply of theaters/screens/showtimes. This creates a specialness to the film at the time that makes it feel like an event. In streaming however, a new piece of content dropping goes into a catalog filled with THOUSANDS of other choices across all platforms. It's just another piece of content in a marketplace filled with it. It's just harder to make it feel like a major unique event.

So in conclusion, I think we're on a path where audiences just are not going to accept the façade of the blockbuster much longer. This may be good or bad depending on your view of modern blockbusters. But I think it is inevitable. I don't see mass audiences reacting to a big-budget film on streaming the way they did again. This applies both to mediocre/bad blockbusters but also the very good ones. Beloved films like Pirates of the Caribbean, The Dark Knight, Avengers, etc. would all have a significantly lesser reaction if they just came straight to streaming. If studios don't start significantly changing things, the blockbuster film as we know it will die.

_________________
MadGez wrote:
Listen to Magnus he knows his shit.
Darth Indiana Bond wrote:
Magnus is right
trixster wrote:
magnus is my hero
Loyal wrote:
Dr. Lecter wrote:
Magnus is the fucking voice of reason.
That's scary.
bABA wrote:
fuck Magnus
zwackerm wrote:
You're incredibly overrated and and if they made a Pixar film about you it would gross less than The Good Dinosaur.


Sun Dec 27, 2020 2:26 pm
Profile
Extraordinary
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 15, 2005 2:41 pm
Posts: 12185
Location: Augsburg (2,035 years young)
Post Re: How Much Does Streaming Ruin The Façade of the Blockbust
Basically, there are two type of movies which greatly improve in reception on the big screen:

Event movies with an eager audience and comedies - a comedy in a full theater will always be funnier than watching it home alone...

_________________
Nothing Compares 2 U


Sun Dec 27, 2020 2:31 pm
Profile WWW
Superfreak
User avatar

Joined: Sat Aug 20, 2005 12:54 am
Posts: 21015
Location: Places
Post Re: How Much Does Streaming Ruin The Façade of the Blockbust
There are a few really vital points here:

- The movie and theater business has been overbuilt and overdue for a correction for a while. Mega-budget "blockbuster" movies opening every weekend will dilute the experience. Megaplex theaters that opened in seemingly every suburb between 1990-2010 were not needed and this was not sustainable. It was a matter of time until this practice shuttered because supply was clearly exceeding demand & this was pre-Covid. Covid has no doubt accelerated this but it was already happening.

So that said,

-The entirety of movie-viewing audience is made of many groups looking for different things out of the experience but the vast majority of moviegoers are looking for basic entertainment escapism, not something that will challenge or educate intellectually. Entertainment has a lot of different meanings to people but from a sheer business perspective, all that matters is what it does to consumers.

-People, generally, like to be around other people when doing things and sharing enthusiasm. Its like going to a sporting event in person versus watching at home, going to be a bustling bar in person vs. drinking at home, etc. The combination of entertainment + crowds creates an energy that can be replicated at home and is infectious to many people. This is where the word "experience" really matters from the consumer perspective because the experiences of at home vs. theater is so different.

Theaters survived significant disruption to consumer behavior brought by TV cable programming, Blockbuster Video, VHS, HBO, Showtime, DVD, Netflix, a great depression and insane World War etc for the primary reason that most people go watch movies in theaters for a very different reason than why one watches a TV or movie at home. People go to movie theaters for the real-world escapist experience that comes with crowds of people and entertainment subject matter.

-Bottomline profitability matters above all to shareholders and services like Disney plus that have what, 100 million subs? will be plateauing very soon. There are 330 million American citizens and not every one of them will be a Disney+ subscriber. :funny: It does not make an ounce of financial sense to play a possible $1 billion grosser that would bring in $500m+ of incremental revenue to the company onto a streaming service that people are already paying for. The overall profitability of releasing it exclusively in theaters before making rentals available on the streaming down the road is much greater than the other way around.

-It will be very cool to how theaters innovate due to this situation. Theaters did not have to innovate for several decades but now they will to remain competitive. BOGO Candy is not what one would consider innovation, either. :funny:

So while consumer behavior was changing and will continue to change, I don't think people need to be THAT concerned. At the end, I think everything returns to normal pretty quickly, with THE BATMAN possibly being the first true mega blockbuster of the post-Covid era.

People "Netflix & chilling" were not going to theater anyway - they were doing some activity at someones place before hooking up. A more relevant example would be going out "dinner & a movie" - very few of these people are going out to eat and then going back home to pay attention to a movie.The people who normally would have seen a brand new movie in theaters and now will opt to watch at home instead are likely quite small.

Streaming - to me - seems like a much, much bigger threat to cable TV than actual movie theaters.

_________________
Ari Emmanuel wrote:
I'd rather marry lindsay Lohan than represent Mel Gibson.


Sun Dec 27, 2020 3:15 pm
Profile
llegó a la casa vía marítima
User avatar

Joined: Sun Aug 05, 2007 4:53 pm
Posts: 5362
Location: la gran casa de la esquina
Post Re: How Much Does Streaming Ruin The Façade of the Blockbust
I think a key element is that certain types of films work best as a communal experience. Blockbusters, horror films, 'event films' fall into this category.

You're also right that the lesser marketing campaign in turn produces a lesser brand. Marvel wouldn't be what it is without the all-consuming ad campaigns for major releases from TV spots to posters everywhere to lunchboxes. The film industry is notorious for spending as much or more to make an event film as to market it, but this is also part of the reason why films can gross so much and certain brands and titles become ingrained in the public's mind. Would have Star Wars turned into a global cultural phenomenon across five decades if each film release hadn't been accompanied by months of deafening promotion and media attention?

It's a bit like if songs weren't sent to radio anymore or played in bars. Sure, you may have a lot of streaming numbers on Spotify, but is it really a hit if you can walk around and live life normally and completely avoid it?

_________________
.


Mon Dec 28, 2020 2:33 am
Profile
Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince

Joined: Sun Apr 12, 2015 7:30 am
Posts: 475
Post Re: How Much Does Streaming Ruin The Façade of the Blockbust
This is actually a good thing. Lame blockbusters in terms of storytelling or character building will no longer get a free pass just because they look somehow visually appealing which in 2021 is hardly an achievement. If streaming pushes people to be a little more demanding quality wise when it comes to blockbusters, then I think in the long run we will all win.

I think Mulan was a good example. With a traditional release it might have gotten a pass as people would have been impressed with the visuals and the whole theater experience would have enhanced it. With a streaming release people saw it for what it was : crap.


Fri Jan 01, 2021 6:22 am
Profile
Angels & Demons

Joined: Fri Aug 05, 2016 4:16 pm
Posts: 227
Post Re: How Much Does Streaming Ruin The Façade of the Blockbust
I agree, but I can’t wait to watch WW84 and will not be here for the negativity. I also think rom coms and other mid Bridget movies should be released in theaters too, I think it’s appalling that these streaming services are all releasing their own movies. That should be to theaters from major studios as well, I really miss the 2000’s when everything was in theaters and thriving, I see no reason why things couldn’t go back to normal. I’m sick of streaming running fucking everything. Warner Bros. Should be ashamed of themselves for releasing their movies to streaming and theaters concurrently


Fri Jan 01, 2021 9:59 pm
Profile
Dont Mess with the Gez
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 24, 2004 9:54 am
Posts: 21145
Location: Melbourne Australia
Post Re: How Much Does Streaming Ruin The Façade of the Blockbust
Streaming is all about TV shows especially serialized ones.

I tend to hold streaming only films in lower regard and most of the time based on quality this is correct.

_________________


What's your favourite movie summer? Let us know @

http://worldofkj.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=85934



Tue Jan 05, 2021 3:31 pm
Profile
007
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jul 20, 2005 11:43 pm
Posts: 9924
Location: Wouldn't you like to know
Post Re: How Much Does Streaming Ruin The Façade of the Blockbust
Magnus is right again!

_________________
Image


Mon Jan 11, 2021 6:27 am
Profile
llegó a la casa vía marítima
User avatar

Joined: Sun Aug 05, 2007 4:53 pm
Posts: 5362
Location: la gran casa de la esquina
Post Re: How Much Does Streaming Ruin The Façade of the Blockbust
MadGez wrote:
Streaming is all about TV shows especially serialized ones.

I tend to hold streaming only films in lower regard and most of the time based on quality this is correct.


The quality control does indeed seem to be a lot lower for streaming. Bird Box for example, which was supposed to be a "phenomenon", is a complete joke compared to something like A Quiet Place. Even The Crown is weirdly sterile compared to your typical high end HBO series.

_________________
.


Fri Jan 15, 2021 2:26 pm
Profile
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Reply to topic   [ 9 posts ] 

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Alo12345 and 16 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group.
Designed by STSoftware for PTF.